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Modern Underground Homes

"As an architect, I'm ashamed of what my fellow professionals and I have done during the last fifty years. What do we do? Look around you: America's best land: destroyed, nature: crushed under buildings and parking lots, resources: squandered, energy: wasted. The saddest part is that we know better and still do nothing about it. We actually know how to build without destroying land." Malcolm Wells.


underground home

Malator Earth House in Druidston, Pembrokeshire, Wales, built in 1998 and designed by architects Future Systems for a former Member of Parliament. Winds flow right over her. The home is known locally as the Teletubby house. www.ala.uk.com


underground home

The roof of the Malator house is entirely covered in local grasses and the bulk of the home closely imitates the neighboring hills. From above, the house is invisible. www.ala.uk.com


underground house

Malator Earth House is barely noticable from the road. storiesofhouses.blogspot.com



underground house

Villa Vals, Switzerland.
The surrounding landscape was left undisturbed and unobstructed by any sort of architectural bump. The three upper bedrooms are flooded with light and views. The first floor includes the kitchen, living room and bedroom that doubles as a library. The villa is thermally insulated and features ground source heat pump, radiant floors, heat exchanger and uses only hydroelectric power generated by the nearby reservoir. SeARCH and CMA: www.search.nl


underground house

Villa Vals, Switzerland.
SeARCH and CMA: www.search.nl


underground home

Aloni, Antiparos Island, Greece.
Deca Architects, 2005-2008.


underground house

Aloni, Antiparos Island, Greece.
The design of the house is a dual response to the particular topography of the site and to the rural dry-rubble stone walls that define agricultural land on the 'Cycladic Island'. The homes mass is imperceptible within the broader landscape of the island. The house is protected from the elements yet is full of natural light. Deca Architects, 2005-2008.


underground house

Aloni, Antiparos Island, Greece.
Deca Architects, 2005-2008.


underground house

Aloni, Antiparos Island, Greece.
Deca Architects, 2005-2008.



underground home

Edgeland House in Austin, Texas, is located on a rehabilitated brownfield site and is a modern re‐interpretation of one of the oldest housing typologies in North America, the Native American Pit House. The Pit House, typically sunken, takes advantage of the earth’s mass to maintain thermal comfort throughout the year. Like this timeless dwelling, Edgeland House’s relationship to the landscape both in terms of approach as well as building performance involves an insulative green roof and a 7‐foot excavation‐ gaining benefits from the earth’s mass to help it stay cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. The home is broken up into two separate pavilions, for the living and sleeping quarters, and requires direct contact with the outside elements to pass from one to the other. Architects: Bercy Chen Studio.


underground house

Edgeland House in Austin, Texas. Architects: Bercy Chen Studio.


underground home

Base Valley House, Japan. Architect Hiroshi Sambuichi believes good design is first and foremost about getting the balance between the building and the earth, right. He sometimes spends up to a year performing on-site observations before he begins to design a project.  “A close examination on how changing wind directions and intensities in daylight influences the site, enables me to understand what kind of architecture is really needed on each location”, explains Sambuichi. His favorite indigenous materials are stone, Japanese cypress and chestnut wood. Via: wallpaper.com


underground house

Base Valley House, Japan.
Via: wallpaper.com


underground house

Base Valley House, Japan.
Via: wallpaper.com



underground home

Underground Home in Greek Isles by Deca Architecture. Close to indestructible. Another underground project by Deca Architecture under construction: adproperties.gr
 


underground home

Bolton Eco-House. "The first zero-carbon property in the North West of England. The owner was passionate about preserving the natural beauty of this area. The four-bedroom, single-storey family home is deliberately embedded into the contours of the Pennine hillside to minimise the impact on the surrounding moorland and has a roof of flora and meadow grasses which flows seamlessly over the property and into the landscape. It has been designed to consume less energy than it uses; a ground source heat pump, photovoltaic panels and a wind turbine will generate on-site renewable energy. The positioning and orientation of the property were carefully considered and the home is to be built using locally sourced building materials and traditional construction methods." makearchitects.com

 

underground house

 
Bolton Eco-House. 
makearchitects.com



underground home

Bolton Eco-House.
Proposed for former captain of the Manchester United football team, Gary Neville. makearchitects.com



earth sheltered house

Partially subteranean, partially above ground.
www.futuretechnology500.com



earth sheltered home
 

Earth sheltered home, Big Sur, California.
The Cooper Point House by organic architect Mickey Muenning, who has been building eco-buildings for over 30 years in Big Sur, California, is completely off-grid and powered by solar. The aerodynamic home reduces resistance to winds that, on occasion, blow more than 100 miles per hour. www.solaripedia.com



earth sheltered house

Becton Dickerson Campus, New Jersey.
A fusion of built structure and land form where the resultant architecture is well hidden and the landscape preserved. Architects: RMJM. More infowww.archdaily.com



underground house

Ktima House.
Designed by Architects Camilo Rebelo, Susana Martins. The location of the house is linked with the topography and designed for the most impressive views. camilorebelo.com


underground house

Underground home in Peru.
Longhi Architects, Pachacamac, Peru.
Lots more: www.archdaily.com


underground house

"A hill in Pachacamac, located 40 km south of Lima near Peru’s coast, is the site for the retirement home of a philosopher. The response to the site’s conditions was to bury the house, trying to create a balanced dialogue between architecture and landscape, where inside / outside becomes a constant interpretation of materiality with strong sense of protection and appreciation of the dark and the light. A glass box sticks out of the hill symbolizing architectural intervention on untouched nature." archdaily.com



underground home

Underground House in Sikamino, Attica, Greece. Architects: Tense Architecture Network. archdaily.com


underground house

Abalone House. Big Sur, California.
Architect: Thomas Cowen.
ranacreekdesign.com



See resources and more info on the Earth Shelters Post...


 



 
 

 

 

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Daria Blackwell
Posts: 4
Comment
Rules and restrictions
Reply #4 on : Fri August 22, 2014, 06:37:49
These are clearly not built anywhere where the local planning authority dictates what can and can't be built, where it can be built, and how it must be built. I wish you would educate planning authorities in places like the UK and Ireland to understand that building with the landscape in times of diminishing resources, climate change, and increasing population must take precedence over so called "traditional aesthetics."
Jude Le Blanc
Posts: 4
Comment
tornado alley
Reply #3 on : Sat June 22, 2013, 08:35:43
The sad thing is that all the homes destroyed by tornados recently will be built the same way just like the Jersey Shore rebuilt after Sandy.

More deaths will be required before it sinks in that some major concrete and steel in shapes that work with winds is the approach to take.
Leo Esquillo
Posts: 4
Comment
ideology, system, environment
Reply #2 on : Sun June 16, 2013, 17:56:14
This is very nice. This is one of the housing systems for man and nature to co-exist.

We must stop destroying our land.
Joan
Posts: 4
Comment
architecture
Reply #1 on : Tue April 16, 2013, 23:17:29
if only we could enjoy such beautiful unobstructed views all the time! Fantastic and thoughtful architecture!
 
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